Study Finds Parents are as Addicted to Devices as Children

 

Students at St. Joseph Academy in Brownsville, Texas, check their smartphones during lunch May 3. (CNS photo/Tyler Orsburn)

Dec 7 2016 – 11:07am | Mark Pattison – Catholic News Service

For adults complaining about America’s youth being saturated in media usage, it appears the apple hasn’t fallen far from the iPad.

Parents spend more than nine hours a day with screen media, and the vast majority of that time is spent with personal screen media, according to a study issued on Dec. 6 by Common Sense Media, a San Francisco-based organization that has long been tracking children’s media usage.

Even so, according to the study, 78 percent of parents believe they are good media and technology role models for their children. Continue Reading

 

 

 

 

 

 

At Home with Faith

A family-focused approach to religious education
Dec 7 2016 – 4:46pm | Randy Young America Magazine Online

Many parents are familiar with the ritual of dropping kids off at parish curbsides once a week for religion class and retrieving them an hour later. This system of education for educating children who do not attend Catholic school is widely accepted. But is this the best way to educate our children in the faith? Many young adults who have completed their catechesis now find themselves disconnected from the church. How can religious education help lay the groundwork for a more lasting faith? Continue Reading Here

 

Tidings of Great Joy

America magazine online
How ‘A Charlie Brown Christmas’ defies common sense

When “A Charlie Brown Christmas” debuted on Dec. 9, 1965, CBS executives were so sure it would fail they informed its executive producer, Lee Mendelson, they were showing it only because they had already announced it in TV Guide. “Maybe it’s better suited to the comic page,” they told him after an advance showing.

Despite six months working on the show, the animation director, Bill Melendez, felt much the same. “By golly, we’ve killed it,” he recalls telling Mendelson after a screening.

The American public disagreed. In fact, 45 percent of Americans with a television set watched “A Charlie Brown Christmas” that night, making it the second highest rated show of the week (behind “Bonanza”). The program would go on to win an Emmy and a Peabody, and it has been broadcast every Christmas season since.

Continue article click here

 

World Youth Day 2016: 7/22-8/2

It’s this week! World Youth Day in Poland with a week’s worth of events. Click on the official link to learn more.

http://www.krakow2016.com/en/

(From the official website) The theme of the XXXI World Youth Day Krakow 2016 is: ‘Blessed are the merciful, for they shall obtain mercy’ (Mt 5:7). Our Holy Father Francis has chosen the fifth of the eight Beatitudes, given by Jesus in his Sermon on the Mount on the shores of the Sea of Galilee, to show the importance of the Beatitudes which are at the heart of Jesus’ teaching. In his first Sermon, Jesus presents us with eight examples of qualities that bring us closer to the Kingdom of God.

The choice of Krakow and World Youth Day’s motto lead us to the Spark of Mercy. Since the appearance of Jesus to St. Sister Faustina, Mercy has been radiating from Krakow-Lagiewniki to the whole universal Church. Krakow is widely known as the centre of worship of God’s mercy, and young pilgrims who come will surely want to see the place of the revelations, Sister Faustina’s tomb, and the shrine – the place where St. John Paul II entrusted the world to God’s Mercy.

It’s worth noting that the fifth Beatitude sums up the first two years of Pope Francis’ pontificate as well. During that time he has striven to show the Church God’s love towards man and the necessity of being merciful to each other.

At a meeting with young Argentinians in Rio, Pope Francis advised: ‘Read the Beatitudes, it will do you good.’ Our task is to re-read the message of the Beatitudes. For three consecutive years, the Pope has chosen for us three out of the eight Beatitudes as the themes for the WYDs. Each one is elaborated on in his addresses, in which he comments on theological matters and gives the youth some tasks for the next year of spiritual work.

 

“Read the Beatitudes – it will do you good.”

Pope Francis, Rio de Janeiro

Family Table Talk

400608_LARGE

Family conversation at mealtime just got a lot more fun—and a lot more faith-filled—with The Meal Box, the perfect antidote to family dinnertime drudgery.

The Meal Box contains 54 cards, each one featuring a creative question guaranteed to spark fun family conversation during family meals. The questions, such as If you could have the voice of any famous person, whose voice would you have?, are sure to engage everyone in the family. The reverse side of each card features a quick “Food for Family Thought” tip from family expert Tom McGrath. The tip makes it easy, and downright fun, for families to apply the question and answers to their lives of faith.

http://www.loyolapress.com/the-meal-box.htm