The Peace Pulpit

Get to Know Jesus More Deeply by Thomas Gumbleton

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Source: The Peace Pulpit | National Catholic Reporter

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What is forgotten cannot be healed

Homily Given by Bishop Gumbleton Click Here to Read Full Text
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Bishop Gumbleton’s Homily for September 17, 2017

Sirach 27:30-28:7

Psalms 103:1-2, 3-4, 9-10, 11-12

Romans 14:7-9

Matthew 18:21-35

Full text of the readings

Excerpted from National Catholic Reporter-September 21, 2017

The lesson of today’s Scriptures, I think, is very clear to us. It’s a lesson about God’s mercy, God’s forgiveness. This is something that is part of our Scriptures, not just in the Gospel. Jesus certainly makes it clear that God is a merciful and forgiving God, but also in the Scriptures of the Old Testament. For example, in today’s psalm, after the first reading, “God is kind and merciful, slow to anger, rich in compassion. God pardons all our iniquities, heals all our ills, saves our life from destruction, crowns us with kindness and compassion.”

The message is so clear: God is a God of mercy; God is a God of love and compassion and forgiveness. There’s a beautiful passage in the book of the prophet Isaiah where the chosen people, in spite of the warning of Isaiah, have formed a military alliance with the Egyptians and have gone off to war. Isaiah had warned them that it would be a disaster, and it was. The chosen people were defeated and they were forced into exile. But then at the conclusion of the passage Isaiah says, “God is waiting to be gracious to you.”

Source: What is forgotten cannot be healed | National Catholic Reporter

Respond to God’s love by loving your neighbor – National Catholic Reporter

by Thomas Gumbleton

A longtime national and international activist in the peace movement, Bishop Thomas Gumbleton is a founding member of Pax Christi USA and an outspoken critic of violence and militarism. He has appeared on numerous radio and television programs, and has published numerous articles and reports.

The Peace Pulpit-As you may recall a couple of weeks ago, the disciples asked Jesus, “Increase our faith.” They were begging him to help them to deepen their life of faith. Then Jesus, over these last couple of weeks, has been showing them and showing us what that means to increase our faith and how we do it. The first thing to remind ourselves of is that when we’re talking about faith in this context, it’s not simply saying “yes” to a list of doctrines. Continue Reading Click Here

Source: Respond to God’s love by loving your neighbor – National Catholic Reporter

Faith is relationship between us and God through Jesus – National Catholic Reporter

Thomas Gumbleton

A longtime national and international activist in the peace movement, Bishop Thomas Gumbleton is a founding member of Pax Christi USA and an outspoken critic of violence and militarism. He has appeared on numerous radio and television programs, and has published numerous articles and reports.

Faith is relationship between us and God through Jesus

The Peace Pulpit: “Will we be people who believe in Jesus … even in those times of stress and difficulty where there seems to be darkness?” Continue Reading Click Here

Or you can listen to Bishop Gumbleton’s homily- click here

Source: Faith is relationship between us and God through Jesus – National Catholic Reporter

The only way to change: begin to live the way of love

I’m sure we’re all aware that the word “gospel” means “good news.” In the beginning of Mark’s Gospel, it’s very simple. The introduction of Mark simply says, “Jesus began to proclaim the good news.” The good news — the reign of God is at hand — what does that mean? It means the love of God is ready to overwhelm all of creation and transform it into that glorious reign of God where peace and joy, fullness of life is there for everyone. That good news emanates from God’s love.

That’s what these lessons teach us today about the love of God. That’s the good news: God loves us with a love that’s unbreakable, unconditional, unlimited. In the first letter of John, the disciple writes, “God is love. Where there is love, there is God.” And then goes on to say, “And this is the love that I mean: that God first loved us.” God never stops loving us. God’s love drew us into existence. We would not be, would not exist if God’s love hadn’t drawn us into existence. Continue reading-click here

[Homily given at St. Charles Lwanga Parish, St. Leo site, Detroit, Mich. The transcripts of Bishop Gumbleton’s homilies are posted weekly to NCRonline.org. Sign up here to receive an email alert when the latest homily is posted.]

Source: The only way to change: begin to live the way of love | National Catholic Reporter

Work for change, keep your eyes fixed on Jesus | National Catholic Reporter

By Thomas Gumbleton

I think most of us are kind of shocked and maybe confused when we hear Jesus say, “Do you think I have come to bring peace on earth?” We expect yes, but instead he says, “No, I tell you, but rather division.” Then he shows how that division cuts through the human family at every level, right down into our immediate families where sometimes we feel the most severe division that brings great pain and hurt within a family.

How can that be? Jesus, born in Bethlehem, angels singing, “Peace on earth to those of good will,” Jesus the Prince of Peace, and he says, “No, I came to bring division.” What is happening is merely, at one sense, a matter of grammar. We think when Jesus says, “I came to bring division,” that that was his intention. But what he’s doing is merely stating a fact. Ultimately, he does promise us peace, but that peace doesn’t come just as a gift falling from heaven. No, it’s a result of the reign of God.

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Source: Work for change, keep your eyes fixed on Jesus | National Catholic Reporter

[Homily given at St. Leo Parish, Detroit, Mich. The transcripts of Bishop Gumbleton’s homilies are posted weekly to NCRonline.org. Sign up here to receive an email alert when the latest homily is posted.]


We must continue this journey of faith | National Catholic Reporter

There’s an amazing phenomenon in nature. Perhaps you’ve heard of it: The migration of the monarch butterflies. This is, as I said, an amazing phenomenon. These butterflies live in the Northeast part of the United States and every year they migrate to Mexico and then turn around and migrate back. It’s astounding just to think about butterflies — such tender and fragile insects, part of the animal kingdom — that they can make that long journey.

But in fact, what’s even more amazing is that none of those who start out make it back. During that migration there are at least seven generations of monarch butterflies that keep the migration going and bring it back. When you think about that, it perhaps can be a good insight into the Scripture lessons today. Each generation of those butterflies, in order for the species to endure, is dependent upon the preceding generations

There would be no monarch butterflies if each generation did not do its part and carry on that migration. In a way that’s what the Scriptures are telling us about faith today. Think about your faith, my faith — we believe in God, we know Jesus as the Son of God, the Holy Spirit. How did all this happen that we are enlightened to know God? As we prayed in the opening prayer, Abraham called God, “Father” or God, our “Mother.” We are sons and daughters of God. How do we come to this understanding?

(There’s more! Click below to read the complete text of Bishop Gumbleton’s inspiring homily.)

Source: We must continue this journey of faith | National Catholic Reporter

Bishop Gumbleton’s homily given at St. Philomena Parish, Detroit, Mich. The transcripts of Bishop Gumbleton’s homilies are posted weekly to NCRonline.org. Scroll to bottom of  article text for the audio of the homily.